Daily Archives: 04/05/2011

Onion news is too real, and loudmouths in many languages sound the same.

The Onion has nailed cable news, especially fox.

http://www.theonion.com/video_embed/?id=18865
Morbid Curiosity Leading Many Voters To Support Palin

Also you find the same thing in other countries, such as Pakistan.  See this.

I found it sad that this is making the rounds to prove that Muslims are particularly intolerant but I think you’ll find authoritarian prudes in Christianity too.  If indeed this woman is seeking asylum because of this, that is a more scary face of Islam than conservative Christians.

Market Failure: Baggage Fees

Fees should be charged for carryon!

Chart Porn

via Baggage Fees.

I hate baggage fees. Interesting fact from below: when airlines started charging fees, 25% of passengers switched to carry-ons — resulting in longer lines at security checkpoints, higher TSA costs, and longer delays in loading/unloading planes. In conclusion: airlines are charging you more money to make your flight experience worse.

image image

 

How Michele Bachmann Could Win | The New Republic

I’ve gone pretty wobbly on Obama, but the Republican are likely to nominate someone who’s push me back from coming home.

 

How Michele Bachmann Could Win | The New Republic.

Economist Mom on: Will the Ryan Budget Start a Real Conversation?

My sense is that Ryan’s plan should include repeal of all of the Bush tax cuts.  I’m not particularly interested in beating up the rich, but Ryan’s plan is too hard on the weakest, and clearly Clinton level taxes are more than bearable.  That said the Democrats need to recognize that going much beyond that with revenues is not politically feasible, or ultimately desirable.

EconomistMom.com

Mom says in part:

And in today’s Washington Post, (Republican) Senator Tom Coburn says it’s time to stop bickering over the little stuff and start working together–as in, with the other side and not just with the extremists in one’s own party–on the big stuff (emphasis added):

Here’s some perspective on this week’s debate: When our grotesquely obese government is borrowing $4.1?billion a day in order to function, the $29?billion gap between the House-passed continuing resolution and a possible compromise is enough to fund the government for seven days. Seven days.

What’s extreme in this debate is not our cuts but our complacency.

It’s time for politicians to tell the truth and talk in trillions, not billions. The $14.2?trillion question before us is whether discussion of our debt crisis is hyperbole and fear-mongering, or whether our debt truly is the “greatest national security threat facing our nation,” to quote Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

This question is critical because until there is a consensus in the country we will never have a consensus in Washington. There is no question that the American people are deeply concerned about spending and deficits. I’m concerned their representatives do not understand how close we are to a crisis. I’ve found great fault with my friend President Obama because this national conversation should be led from a presidential podium, not by political odd couples in the Senate. But in the absence of leadership from others in Congress or the administration, I will continue to work with any colleague from either side of the aisle who is honest about this country’s fiscal peril…

via Will the Ryan Budget Start a Real Conversation?.

Bainbridge: I honestly don’t understand Obama’s Libya policy

ProfessorBainbridge.com

via I honestly don’t understand Obama’s Libya policy.

He says:

I honestly don’t get it. Obama starts an undeclared war without Congressional approval, spends a few hundred million dollars, because Qaddafi was about to smash the rebels outside of Benghazi. Then after a couple of weeks, he has the US effectively pull its fighters and bombers out of the war, turning tail and running. With the US out of the picture, Qaddafi is again smashing the rebels. So how is all this helping?

Meanwhile, there’s a bloody civil war going on in the Ivory Coast, violent repression of protests in Syria, Yemen trembling on the brink of something bad, and the US does nothing.

Whatever happened to the Powell doctrine? If we’re going to make war on Qadaffi, do it right, kill him, take out his senior staff, and get out. Otherwise, stay out. This sort of half-hearted nonsense, however, seems the worst of all worlds.

I think the hope was that we could leverage a small role for US forces to prime the pump for Europe or others to do the heavy lifting, that would lead to a negotiated end the Qadaffi government.  So far though its not clear that is happening.